ANDREW WILSON AUTHOR - LATEST ON MY BOOKS, JOURNALISM AND LIFE



Non-fiction investigation into the aftermath of the Titanic disaster, examining how the sinking shaped the lives of some of the survivors. To be published by Simon & Schuster on 27 October 2011 in the UK and on 6 March 2012 in the US.

Here is the UK cover.















A link to my UK publishers:

Buy a copy of the book at UK amazon:



Shadow of the Titanic, US cover
And this is the US cover.

















A link to my US publishers:


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Other books:


(2007, Canongate, UK; Atria, Simon & Schuster, USA, and sold to a further 14 territories)
Shortlisted for the Jelf First Novel Award (2007)

A literary thriller set in Venice and England. Described by the Washington Post as ‘an extraordinary work of imaginative genius, meshing Dickens’s gothic atmosphere with Hitchcock’s suspenseful creepiness’. 



(Bloomsbury, 2007)

‘Wilson has written a cultural exploration of post-World War II America, when the country appeared to cast off the last shackles of Puritanism in order to embrace guilt-free hedonism – sex, drugs, money and pleasure’ – USA Today


(Bloomsbury, 2003)

Shortlisted for the Whitbread Biography Prize (2003) 
Winner of Edgar Allan Poe Award, Biography (2004)
Winner of LAMBDA Literary Award (2003)

The first biography of the author, the book was described by novelist Gary Indiana as a ‘tour de force, an account so generous and prescient that Highsmith seems to step from its pages like a hologram, in all her contradictory glory’ (LA Times).

‘Every adult has secrets’ says one of the characters in Patricia Highsmith’s lesbian novel CAROL, first published under a pseudonym in 1952 as THE PRICE OF SALT. Indeed, Highsmith — author of STRANGERS ON A TRAIN and THE TALENTED MR RIPLEY — had more than her fair share. During her life, she felt uncomfortable about discussing the source of her fiction and refused to answer questions about her private life. Yet after her death in February 1995, Highsmith left behind a vast archive of personal documents — diaries, notebooks and letters — which detail the links between her life and her work. Drawing on these astonishingly intimate papers, together with material gleaned from her closest friends and lovers, Andrew Wilson has written the first biography of an author described by Graham Greene as the ‘poet of apprehension’ and by Gore Vidal as ‘one of our greatest modernist writers’. In this compelling biography Andrew Wilson illuminates the dark corners of Highsmith’s life, casts light on mysteries of the creative process and reveals the secrets that the writer chose to keep hidden until after her death.
 

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